2009 Chateau Cheval Blanc

Red Bordeaux Blend

France / Bordeaux / Libournais / Saint-Emilion Grand Cru

¥1,296,200
RP 100
Size:
量:

2009 Chateau Cheval Blanc, Saint-Emilion Grand Cru, France

2009 was a warm, dry year, but not to excess.
Wonderfully ripe grapes account for this very great vintage of Château Cheval Blanc which is tremendously smooth with impressive concentration and exuberant richness.
This wine leaves a strong impression and will continue to do so for many years​.

Weather conditions and vine’s growing cycle

TEMPERATURES AND RAINFALL
The beginning of the growing season, in April, was wet. However, summer was quite dry from mid-July to mid-September. After two days of rain on the 19th and 20th of September, a period of dry and remarkably stable weather set in and lasted until late October. Average temperatures throughout the growth cycle were slightly above-average. The months of June and August were fairly hot. Mild daytime weather in September alternated with remarkably cool nights.

WATER BALANCE
In order to grow well, the vine needs for water stress to set in slowly so the grapes to ripen well and become concentrated. There were periods with significant water deficit in 2009 even though the level of precipitation throughout the growing season was greater than average. Temperatures were fairly high (but not excessively so), gradually increasing the water deficit by causing major transpiration in the vines. Furthermore, a long dry period set in on the 10th of August, lasting until the 17th of September. There was a great deal of water stress early on in plots with gravelly soil, but this wsa later-occurring and more moderate in other types of soil. This water stress reduced the size of the berries and made for an early stop to vegetative growth – and thus an early start to ripening. It also blocked ripening in certain plots of young vines whose root system was insufficiently developed.

GROWING SEASON
Bud break took place in the last week in March for Merlot and early April for Cabernet Franc. This was slightly later than usual. However, the vines made up for the delay by the time flowering occurred. Véraison took place in the first week of August. The first plots of Merlot were picked on the 15th of September, and Cabernet Franc was harvested between 28th of September and the 7th of October.
Variable weather early in the season called for careful attention to fight an outbreak of mildew. The attack receded when dry weather came in July. Water stress slowed down vegetative growth and limited the size of the grapes: two essential factors for a great vintage. Bunch thinning during véraison (colour change) helped to even out ripening. The grapes were picked in fine, nearly perfect condition. The beautiful, very stable weather during the harvest (15th of September to the 7th of October) meant that fruit in every plot was at just the right degree of ripeness, without a trace of grey rot.

Phenological stages for Merlot and Cabernet Franc in the year 2009 and their averages from 1994 to 2014 are as follows:
- Bud break for Merlot in 2009 occurred on March 31st, while the average date between 1994-2014 was March 28th. For Cabernet Franc in 2009, bud break was on April 4th, with the average date being April 2nd.
- Flowering for Merlot in 2009 was on May 30th, consistent with its average. For Cabernet Franc, flowering was on June 1st, also consistent with its average.
- Véraison for Merlot in 2009 was noted on August 1st, a day earlier than its average of August 2nd. Cabernet Franc experienced véraison on August 6th in 2009, compared to the average of August 8th.
- The beginning of the harvest for Merlot in 2009 was September 15th, four days earlier than the average. For Cabernet Franc, it began on September 28th in 2009, one day later than the average.
- The end of the harvest for Merlot in 2009 was October 2nd, five days later than the average. In contrast, Cabernet Franc's harvest ended on October 7th in 2009, two days later than the average.
The number of days between the phenological stages were as follows:
- Between bud break and flowering, Merlot in 2009 had a 60-day period, compared to the 63-day average. Cabernet Franc had 58 days in 2009, versus a 60-day average.
- Between flowering and véraison, Merlot in 2009 had 63 days, compared to the 64-day average. Cabernet Franc had 67 days in 2009, one day less than the 68-day average.
- Finally, between véraison and harvest, Merlot in 2009 had a period of 46 days, two days less than the average. Cabernet Franc had a 53-day period in 2009, three days longer than the average.

Features of the vintage

RIPENING AND YIELDS
The long dry spell in July and August was important in concentrating the grapes and also led to slightly lower-than-average yields. Mild temperatures in August and September were very conducive to good ripening, while cool evenings in September locked in freshness and aromatics. The combination of these three factors resulted in a great vintage. When it came time to pick, the grapes were very sweet, with low acid – a sign of complete ripeness. Anthocyanin content was especially high, indicative of superlative tannins and wines with great ageing potential.

Merlot  
2009 yields (hl/ha): 37.8, Average from 1996 to 2014: 38.9
Cabernet Franc  
2009 yields (hl/ha): 32.8, Average from 1996 to 2014: 34.2


CELLAR WORK
2009 Cheval Blanc was not at all chaptalised. Approximately 3% of the juice was bled off, and the wine was aged in 100% new oak barrels for 18-17 months.
Traditional fining with egg white was done in order to settle particles in suspension in barrel. Two eggs were used per barrel, then the wine was filtered.

BLENDING
Degree of alcohol: 14
Total acidity (g H2 S04/L): 2.95
Volatile acidity (g H2 SO4/L): 0.47
pH: 3.71
Total SO2 (mg/L): 120
Reducing sugar conten(g/L): 1.6
IPT (DO280): 77

Tasting

15 April 2010
The weather this year was ideal, with all the parameters for a very great vintage combining concentration, freshness, and finesse. 2010 Cheval Blanc has a dark, intense colour and a superbly deep, complex, and concentrated nose typical of great Cabernet Franc. The bouquet displays seductive floral and fruity aromas, along with fresh fig, blackcurrant, blackberry, and raspberry, as well as notes of bergamot and mint. With aeration, more floral notes appear, especially violet. The flavour is assertive from the very first, with fine-grained tannin that melts in the mouth. The wine is rich, compact, and silky on the middle palate. Tastes typical of great Cabernet Franc, and that only the greatest wines of Bordeaux can provide, come to the fore – particularly subtle floral nuances, such as violet. The aftertaste is never-ending and remarkably fresh. The power and richness of the vintage are kept in check by this delicate freshness that accounts for a perfect balance between concentration and finesse, right up until the end of the long finish. A complete and very complex wine, 2010 Cheval Blanc’s outstanding balance will enable it to age for many years.

RP 100

Robert Parker Wine Advocate

Deep garnet colored, the 2009 Cheval Blanc offers up profound notions of baked blueberries, blackberry compote and crème de cassis with suggestions of chocolate mint, new leather and cloves plus a waft of candied violets. Medium to full-bodied, the palate is an exercise in elegance with very classy, super fine-grained tannins, beautiful freshness and layer upon layer of mineral-laced blue and black fruits, finishing long and perfumed. Reviewed by Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Issue date: March 2019. Drinking window: 2020 - 2057.

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  • CRITICAL REVIEWS
  • WINEMAKER NOTES
RP 100

Robert Parker Wine Advocate

Deep garnet colored, the 2009 Cheval Blanc offers up profound notions of baked blueberries, blackberry compote and crème de cassis with suggestions of chocolate mint, new leather and cloves plus a waft of candied violets. Medium to full-bodied, the palate is an exercise in elegance with very classy, super fine-grained tannins, beautiful freshness and layer upon layer of mineral-laced blue and black fruits, finishing long and perfumed. Reviewed by Lisa Perrotti-Brown, Issue date: March 2019. Drinking window: 2020 - 2057.

2009 Chateau Cheval Blanc, Saint-Emilion Grand Cru, France

2009 was a warm, dry year, but not to excess.
Wonderfully ripe grapes account for this very great vintage of Château Cheval Blanc which is tremendously smooth with impressive concentration and exuberant richness.
This wine leaves a strong impression and will continue to do so for many years​.

Weather conditions and vine’s growing cycle

TEMPERATURES AND RAINFALL
The beginning of the growing season, in April, was wet. However, summer was quite dry from mid-July to mid-September. After two days of rain on the 19th and 20th of September, a period of dry and remarkably stable weather set in and lasted until late October. Average temperatures throughout the growth cycle were slightly above-average. The months of June and August were fairly hot. Mild daytime weather in September alternated with remarkably cool nights.

WATER BALANCE
In order to grow well, the vine needs for water stress to set in slowly so the grapes to ripen well and become concentrated. There were periods with significant water deficit in 2009 even though the level of precipitation throughout the growing season was greater than average. Temperatures were fairly high (but not excessively so), gradually increasing the water deficit by causing major transpiration in the vines. Furthermore, a long dry period set in on the 10th of August, lasting until the 17th of September. There was a great deal of water stress early on in plots with gravelly soil, but this wsa later-occurring and more moderate in other types of soil. This water stress reduced the size of the berries and made for an early stop to vegetative growth – and thus an early start to ripening. It also blocked ripening in certain plots of young vines whose root system was insufficiently developed.

GROWING SEASON
Bud break took place in the last week in March for Merlot and early April for Cabernet Franc. This was slightly later than usual. However, the vines made up for the delay by the time flowering occurred. Véraison took place in the first week of August. The first plots of Merlot were picked on the 15th of September, and Cabernet Franc was harvested between 28th of September and the 7th of October.
Variable weather early in the season called for careful attention to fight an outbreak of mildew. The attack receded when dry weather came in July. Water stress slowed down vegetative growth and limited the size of the grapes: two essential factors for a great vintage. Bunch thinning during véraison (colour change) helped to even out ripening. The grapes were picked in fine, nearly perfect condition. The beautiful, very stable weather during the harvest (15th of September to the 7th of October) meant that fruit in every plot was at just the right degree of ripeness, without a trace of grey rot.

Phenological stages for Merlot and Cabernet Franc in the year 2009 and their averages from 1994 to 2014 are as follows:
- Bud break for Merlot in 2009 occurred on March 31st, while the average date between 1994-2014 was March 28th. For Cabernet Franc in 2009, bud break was on April 4th, with the average date being April 2nd.
- Flowering for Merlot in 2009 was on May 30th, consistent with its average. For Cabernet Franc, flowering was on June 1st, also consistent with its average.
- Véraison for Merlot in 2009 was noted on August 1st, a day earlier than its average of August 2nd. Cabernet Franc experienced véraison on August 6th in 2009, compared to the average of August 8th.
- The beginning of the harvest for Merlot in 2009 was September 15th, four days earlier than the average. For Cabernet Franc, it began on September 28th in 2009, one day later than the average.
- The end of the harvest for Merlot in 2009 was October 2nd, five days later than the average. In contrast, Cabernet Franc's harvest ended on October 7th in 2009, two days later than the average.
The number of days between the phenological stages were as follows:
- Between bud break and flowering, Merlot in 2009 had a 60-day period, compared to the 63-day average. Cabernet Franc had 58 days in 2009, versus a 60-day average.
- Between flowering and véraison, Merlot in 2009 had 63 days, compared to the 64-day average. Cabernet Franc had 67 days in 2009, one day less than the 68-day average.
- Finally, between véraison and harvest, Merlot in 2009 had a period of 46 days, two days less than the average. Cabernet Franc had a 53-day period in 2009, three days longer than the average.

Features of the vintage

RIPENING AND YIELDS
The long dry spell in July and August was important in concentrating the grapes and also led to slightly lower-than-average yields. Mild temperatures in August and September were very conducive to good ripening, while cool evenings in September locked in freshness and aromatics. The combination of these three factors resulted in a great vintage. When it came time to pick, the grapes were very sweet, with low acid – a sign of complete ripeness. Anthocyanin content was especially high, indicative of superlative tannins and wines with great ageing potential.

Merlot  
2009 yields (hl/ha): 37.8, Average from 1996 to 2014: 38.9
Cabernet Franc  
2009 yields (hl/ha): 32.8, Average from 1996 to 2014: 34.2


CELLAR WORK
2009 Cheval Blanc was not at all chaptalised. Approximately 3% of the juice was bled off, and the wine was aged in 100% new oak barrels for 18-17 months.
Traditional fining with egg white was done in order to settle particles in suspension in barrel. Two eggs were used per barrel, then the wine was filtered.

BLENDING
Degree of alcohol: 14
Total acidity (g H2 S04/L): 2.95
Volatile acidity (g H2 SO4/L): 0.47
pH: 3.71
Total SO2 (mg/L): 120
Reducing sugar conten(g/L): 1.6
IPT (DO280): 77

Tasting

15 April 2010
The weather this year was ideal, with all the parameters for a very great vintage combining concentration, freshness, and finesse. 2010 Cheval Blanc has a dark, intense colour and a superbly deep, complex, and concentrated nose typical of great Cabernet Franc. The bouquet displays seductive floral and fruity aromas, along with fresh fig, blackcurrant, blackberry, and raspberry, as well as notes of bergamot and mint. With aeration, more floral notes appear, especially violet. The flavour is assertive from the very first, with fine-grained tannin that melts in the mouth. The wine is rich, compact, and silky on the middle palate. Tastes typical of great Cabernet Franc, and that only the greatest wines of Bordeaux can provide, come to the fore – particularly subtle floral nuances, such as violet. The aftertaste is never-ending and remarkably fresh. The power and richness of the vintage are kept in check by this delicate freshness that accounts for a perfect balance between concentration and finesse, right up until the end of the long finish. A complete and very complex wine, 2010 Cheval Blanc’s outstanding balance will enable it to age for many years.

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